Homepage

08/20/2017
Updated: 08/09/2018
Nagasaki was not the primary target for the nuclear attack the United States launched against Japan on the morning of August 9, 1945. It had barely even made the list of potential targets for atomic bombings. Kokura was the primary target, and Nagasaki was the secondary target should weather conditions have prevented the attack on Kokura. Conditions for the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, which occurred three days earlier, were perfect — sunny, clear skies, nothing to obscure the target. Not so on August 9 over Kokura. The city was obscured by clouds and smoke coming from a nearby town that had been, ironically enough, firebombed by the U.S. the day before. This was a big problem.
read more...History War Science
06/14/2017

It looks like we can add "survivor of mass extinction" to the list of awesomeness associated with pronghorns. According to this piece on the BBC website, while mastodons, giant sloths, and camels were dying off like a bunch of evolutionary wimps 11,000 years ago, the pronghorn kept bounding along the American plains and deserts like a happy-go-lucky little smart-ass.

read more...Science Biology Animals
06/02/2017

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was first released in the U.K. on May 26, 1967, and in the U.S. on June 2 of that year, exactly 50 years before this Second Thoughts entry. Widely regarded as the greatest album of all time, it is also one of the most widely recognized album covers.

read more...History Arts & Pop Culture Music Sports
07/14/2017
Updated: 03/13/2018

Madison Square Garden is New York's premier indoor arena and venue. It is the home of the the New York Knicks (NBA), the New York Liberty (WNBA), and the New York Rangers (NHL) sports franchises. It is the main venue for the Men's Big East Basketball Conference Tournament, the National Invitational Tournament Final and many other sporting and boxing events. Even the first Wrestlemania was held there.

read more...History Architecture Arts & Pop Culture Sports
05/14/2017

One thing we never mentioned in the K2 article here at SilverMedals.net is that even though the mountain has been climbed many times, it has never been summited in the winter. That may not seem like much of a necessary fact for most readers, but for mountain climbers that is significant. For the most part, mountains are harder to climb in the winter, especially the 14 peaks on Earth that are over 8,000m.

read more...Sports Geography
10/11/2017

You'd think that if finding out the first person to do something was relatively easy, then finding the second person to do something would be just as easy, right? SilverMedals finds that this is not the case in many cases, and annoyingly so. For instance who was the second person to circumnavigate the globe? Most of us American kids learned in school that the first person to lead a round-the-world expedition, or circumnavigation, was the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, or rather Fernão de Magalhães1 as it should be written in the proper Portuguese.

read more...History Geography Exploration SilverMedals
04/18/2017

This is one of those "only-people-interested-in-SilverMedals-type-stuff" entries. While researching two upcoming pieces for SilverMedals ("Thomas Jefferson's Second Dome" and "The Second Madison Square Garden"), the famous architect Stanford White came to figure prominently in both, which was not something that I had anticipated.

read more...Arts & Pop Culture Architecture History U.S. Presidents
04/21/2017

It was common during WWII for USAF (United States Air Force) ground crews to write out little messages on bombs meant to be dropped on the enemy. It was a sort of middle finger to the soldiers whom they blamed for there being a war in the first place. There are even stories of bomber crew members throwing trash out the plane as an extra bit of nastiness and rancor to go along with usual payload of high-explosive and incendiary ordinance.

read more...History War
09/13/2017

The main idea behind SilverMedals.net isn't only to highlight the people who finished in second place, sequels, or second superlatives of things (second biggest, second smallest, etc.) but also to present those who lost in a notable contest, battle, or conflict of whatever sort. The loser here is not the loser in the negative sense, but more in the straight up definition as the side that lost the event.

read more...SilverMedals
03/31/2017

Since SilverMedals.net launched in February, the site has been fortunate in attracting a growing base of curious readers from all over the world. Changes are always coming without any real schedule other than me wanting to get things in-place, and I wanted to created a better space to establish those. So this is the first entry for the "Second Thoughts" portion of this site, where I, we, whomever else I can get to write on this site will present further thoughts on the site and all things relevant to SilverMedals.net. This may include updates, corrections, quick-hit bits, etc. 

read more...
03/30/2017
Updated: 09/12/2017

Geri Reischl may not be a household name but she occupies a rather unique place in American pop-cultural history. Some may know her for her singing. Some may know her for her toy ads in the late 60s and early 70s.

read more...Arts & Pop Culture Music Television Actors
03/11/2017
Updated: 11/14/2017
When Pac-Man came out in 1980, it was big. I mean really big. Like “stand in a 10-person line to play for just a few minutes” big. For the price of 25¢, you could guide Pac-Man — a little, binge-eating, yellow, three-quarter circle — through a maze loaded with tasty little white pellets, while being chased by four colorful little ghosts named Inky, Blinky, Pinky, and Clyde. Ms. Pac-Man, the sequel to Pac-Man and the second game in the Pac-Man series, was an even bigger success. The game itself was the same, but the game play was better. Ms. Pac-Man travelled faster, as did the ghosts. There were 4 mazes as opposed to the one that you kept playing over and over again in Pac-Man. The ghosts were “smarter” too, that is, they weren’t as predictable as those in Pac-Man. Then of course, there was Ms. Pac-Man, who was just so darn cute.
read more...Arts & Pop Culture Computers Video Games
02/27/2017
Updated: 02/22/2018

Attempts to summit K2 begin in Islamabad. From there you will spend a day driving in a rickety bus toward the town of Skardu on the dangerous Karakoram Highway (and they’re using the term “highway” VERY loosely here). You’ll probably have an armed guard wth your party because aside from the road itself being dangerous, there are people on it who want to rob you.

read more...Geography Science History Exploration Sports
01/20/2017
As most of us all know, in American politics, it’s the electoral college and not the popular vote that determines the winner in a presidential election. This odd fact of government has long been a burr in the butt of those who’ve found themselves losing end of an electoral vote despite having the majority of voters behind them. So honor of, and I can't believe I'm actually writing this, "The Donald’s" swearing in as 45th president of the U.S. today, it seems a good time to highlight some previous elections where, like the most recent, the winner finished second place in the popular vote. 
read more...History Politics U.S. Presidents
01/11/2017
Updated: 08/01/2017

When the Pixies1 reunited in 2004, it was a huge prayer answered for many devoted fans. Having previously been disbanded in 1992 by frontman Black Francis, a.k.a. Frank Black—real name Charles Thompson (which is what we'll call him for the rest of this piece)—the odds of the post-punk band ever playing again seemed slim at best. There were stories of acrimony, personality clashes, and creative differences between the members, all of which was standard band-breaking-up stuff, but this breakup felt colder and deeper than most. No public feuds. No tell-all books or articles.

read more...Arts & Pop Culture Music Musicians

Advertisement